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19
Aug

a corporate American heart?

american heartTomorrow I will be wired with a heart monitor and will have an echocardiogram, too.  Then, on Friday, a stress test.  The problem is I am so stressed about this whole thing – surely it’ll say BINGO: Stressed you are!

Seriously, I am not too worried, though it is nerve wracking nonetheless.  Millions of people lucky enough to have health insurance will have their hearts monitored and poked and prodded and peeked at on any given day of the week in this country.  So, it’s nothing to worry about, right?  Yeah. Right.  

My friend’s 17 year old son, who is a big strapping football player, 6’5” (perhaps taller), is coincidentally having the same testing on the same day (he in Ohio; I in Florida).   His testing is a result of a pulled muscle near his dear young heart; my testing is a result of my old heart that I have carried too long on my sleeve.   

He and I have insurance.  How lucky we are.

My heart is grateful for the insurance that I carry, but hurts to think that not all Americans have the same good fortune as I and could die sooner than I from heart disease that goes undetected. 

I remain hopeful that soon our country will wake up and know an equitable answer to this insurance crisis.  We are Americans; that means we have a responsibility to care for each other and remember that we are all equal – truly we are. 

Americans can solve the health care crisis, corporations cannot.  Corporations are bound by law to ensure their shareholders benefit monetarily – every breath they take, every move a corporation makes is to ensure profit for its shareholders, and therefore corporations are not bound to serve the good health or the goodwill of those living in America.

As wonderful as many corporations are, they are in business only to serve their bottom line.  I am not trying to be critical – I am stating a fact. Insurance companies, drug companies, or any other ancillary corporate entity will not solve this for us.  We must let our government try.  Unlike big corporate business, the government has the American people to please, not shareholders whose pockets need to be lined by law.  Shareholder profits will be made before care is given to our poor hearts.

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