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Posts tagged ‘racism’

14
Nov

rage against racism – RAGE!

Reading the Opinion Page of the New York Times today confirmed the horror I feared would result from Alabama’s new Immigration law – which is illegal but Alabama is bold in their racism – raising its middle finger at Federal laws.

How to put into words the terror that people in Alabama are experiencing is hardly possible – my heart is literally in my throat as I write this.  I want to help these people; I want to join this 2011 Civil Rights battle more than anything in the world.  I feel helpless.  Well, I have this little blog that some of you may read and then realize the seriousness and the desperation of this problem.

Civil Rights March on Washington, leaders marc...

Image via Wikipedia

I wrote about this issue on November 6th in a post titled, Alabama Ignores Justice Department, because I knew it could get very ugly for children trying to attend school.  NEVER, never-ever did I imagine the reality of this issue.

I never wanted to believe that Alabama could turn their Immigration policy into vile racism.  Alabama’s brand of hatred drips with the blood of all who came before and fought and died for Civil Rights in this country.

The New York Times editorial from November 13, 2011 tells us this about the Alabama immigration law:

The law was written to deny immigrants without papers the ability to work or travel, to own or rent a home, to enter contracts of any kind. Fear is causing an exodus as Latinos abandon homes and jobs and crops in the fields. Utilities are preparing to shut off water, power and heat to customers who cannot show the right papers.

Alabama is far from alone in passing a law whose express aim is misery and panic. States are expanding their power to hasten racial exclusion and family disintegration, to make a particular ethnic group of poor people disappear. The new laws come cloaked in talk of law and order; the bigotry beneath them is never acknowledged.

The below words spoken by a US Senator should frighten the very life out of all of every one of us:

A sponsor of the legislation, State Senator Scott Beason, chairman of the Rules Committee, was secretly taped by the F.B.I. talking about black residents of Greene County. “They’re aborigines,” he said. He is the lawmaker who urged fellow Republicans to “empty the clip” to stop illegal immigrants.

How can Senator Beason be allowed to stay in Government?  He is the lowest of the low; a neanderthals brain is his to claim.

How can he say things like “empty the clip” and not be arrested or charged?  What a fine example of a lawmaker he is.

The important aspect in this article?  The ease with which people can hate.

Today the hate extends to immigrants in Alabama, and other states (Alabama is the worst).  What about tomorrow?  Who is next on the list?

As Judge U. W. Clemon, a former Alabama senator, noted, the Latino immigrant population is very small and yet the target Alabama has placed on their backs is startling:

…..Judge Clemon, a civil rights foot soldier who fought Bull Connor and George Wallace, the common thread between then and now — the threat of racial profiling and the abuse of a cheap, exploited work force — is obvious, as is the racism driving the law.

Although the Hispanic population of the state is less than 5 percent, the leaders of the state were hell-bent on removing as much of that 4 percent as possible. And I think they’ve been fairly successful in scaring them out of the state of Alabama.

How can American citizens with any conscious allow such hateful treatment to fellow human beings?  These immigrant human beings simply want a better life and they are willing to work their fingers to the bone for the basics.  They’ll do the jobs that Americans don’t want to do.

Anyone who thinks immigrants are taking jobs away from Americans is living in a dream world.

Wake up!  They simply want to put clothes on their back and a roof over their head.

Alabama would deny immigrants even the basic needs of survival.  Can you imagine having the below things taken away from you?   I can’t imagine being denied the below basic needs.

Immigrants cannot….

  • Own or rent a home
  • work
  • travel
  • have water service
  • electric
  • heat
  • basic K-12 education

The NAACP’s leaders in Birmingham Alabama have groups of advocates to assist people caught in this government noose.

I feel helpless.  However, I am a member of the NAACP;  now I am going to get to work and get ACTIVE.

“Jim Crow is dead,” said the Reverend Anthony Alann Johnson, “but his cousins are still alive.”

You better believe it.

Please help by finding your local NAACP branch and join us to fight for Civil Rights.

 

References:

Read the article: On the Rise in Alabama

Slide Show: A New Civil Rights Movement

23
Sep

guilty of being black in Georgia

Racism.  It is a horrible reality in our country.  I know we don’t like to discuss it, but it’s there, it’s pervasive, it’s sickening.

What is racism anyway?   If we break it down, what does it imply at its heart?  I think it boils down to two things:  Superiority and skin color.

My skin is pale white and I have freckles that I hate, they cover my arms, legs and chest.  The skin on my face is also pale, not pasty, just pale with some freckles.   Growing up near the beach in South Florida, I loved the ocean and the sun.  I’m paying for my sun-worshiping days now.  No skin cancer – yet – but the way I baked my skin when I was young, doctors always have an eye on my freckles.

I’ve always loved dark skin.  And the darker the better.   (I’d like all my freckles to merge into a rich mahogany color.)

Unfortunately, we can’t pick our skin color, it’s a gift we’re born with.   If Troy Davis’ skin was a pale color would he have gotten clemency, too?

The man pictured below, is the color of his skin dictate how deserving he is of pardon?  Yes, says the Parole Board of Georgia.

The man below is a murderer but was not murdered last night.  Before Troy’s casket was sealed, the Parole Board of the State of Georgia gave this man clemency.

Samuel David Crowe

Wouldn’t you think that the death penalty in Troy Davis’ case would give people pause, or prompt them to consider the consequences of killing an innocent?  There was too much doubt to kill Troy Davis!  But he was black….. Guilty of being black in Georgia.

Georgia murders more black men on death row than white.

There are Southerners and Skin Heads who hate a person’s skin color with such a passion.  it must be something that’s inbred – inherited from childhood, I think.

When I read that just last night this white man was given clemency in Georgia the night after Troy was murdered, it proved to me that the application of murder in Troy’s case was  racially motivated.  Why else would they put him to death and save this man?

They put him to death because good ole boys and girls in Georgia are not expected to have a conscious when it comes to a black person, particularly a black man who is believed to have murdered a white cop.

Troy Davis’ murder was, in my opinion, as much of a hate crime as the recently murdered Texas man who hitched a black man to his truck and dragged him to his death.

Troy Davis is guilty of being black in Georgia.

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